Making the switch to a cruelty-free beauty routine

cruelty-free beauty

The beauty industry is bigger than ever, with constant new launches being released on a daily basis. It’s at this time that I’ve decided to fully make the switch to cruelty-free beauty.

Today, I’d like to talk about why I’m transitioning to all cruelty-free beauty products here on Marble Beauty. Partly because the content will be changing (there will be brands which will not appear on my blog again unless they become cruelty-free), partly because it will help solidify my decision, and finally, because it might encourage someone else who has been on the fence about going cruelty-free to take the jump.

Why I’m switching to cruelty-free beauty products

In a nutshell, I’ve decided that because there are brands out there who do not test on animals to make sure products are safe for human use, I can no longer justify purchasing products from brands that do test on animals.

I don’t claim to be an expert on the topic by any means, but for anyone who is still in the dark about animal testing, I’ll share a bit of background information.

Animal testing is illegal in the UK. However in some countries (such as China), it is the law that any beauty products being sold must be tested on animals. Therefore any brand who sells beauty products in such countries is not a cruelty-free brand.

It’s a shame that as consumers, it is up to us to deep-dive into research about whether a company tests on animals. I think it’d be interesting to see the impact on consumer’s buying habits if the products were labelled as ‘harmful beauty products’ or have a symbol to how that they are a ‘cruel’ rather than ‘cruelty-free’.

What’s the point?

At first, I carried on buying makeup from any old brand, justifying the guilt by thinking “How would me not buying their products help anyway, they’re still going to test on animals!”. But really, if more people stop purchasing from brands who would in turn, see their sales drop, they will eventually (hopefully) take action and listen to their consumers. So it really is a case of ‘every little helps’. If we avoid those brands, it can help make a difference!

So how to make the switch to cruelty-free?

When I first started to look into going cruelty-free with my beauty routine, I felt completely overwhelmed at how most of my products were from brands who tested on animals – from my mascaras and foundations to my deodorants and shower gel. It felt like too much to switch all at once. I made a pact to myself that I would use up the products that I already own (as I’m trying to waste less when it comes to beauty), but not to purchase any more products from brands who test on animals.

One of the concerns I first had was that I’d need to spend a lot more to go cruelty-free but I was wrong. Superdrug’s entire own-brand product range is cruelty-free, as is Boots. The Body Shop, MUA, Revolution, LA Girl, GOSH, ELF, WetnWild, Milani, Pixi, Ardell, Bare Minerals and NYX are just a few of the well-known high-street brands who are cruelty-free! Yay! There is SO much choice and you really don’t need to spend a fortune. I’m actually saving money in choosing many of Superdrug’s own brand skin and bodycare, which I’ve been so impressed with in terms of quality.

I’ve also found great joy in hunting out ‘dupes’ of my old favourite products which were not cruelty-free. For example, instead of the Neutrogena Hydro Boost Gel Cream, I now use the Boots No7 Hydraluminous Gel Moisturiser which is an almost identical product with all the same skin benefits but was cruelty-free. Win win!

How am I finding it so far?

I’m not claiming to be making the perfect transition in the slightest! I had been longing to try the Khiels Creamy Eye cream for years, and a quick search on their site made it look as though they were cruelty-free. It was only after purchasing when I found them on a list of brands who sell in China. I was gutted – it was an expensive product that I hadn’t looked into carefully enough. I’m going to use up the product, but will not be repurchasing.

That’s one thing I would suggest for anyone who is switching – don’t rely on the brand’s own website. The brands that do test on animals often have a clever way of making it seem like they are an ethical, non-testing brand through the way it is worded. Generally, you’ll see something like “We do not condone or conduct animal testing nor ask others to on our behalf”. Then somewhere underneath, it’ll say “except when required by law”. So what they’re really saying is, we DO test on animals.

I choose now to search external, independent websites. Cruelty-free Kitty for example, is a great place to check whether a brand tests on animals or not. Now I’m getting much more familiar with which brands to avoid, so it just takes a bit of time to get used to this new way of shopping.

Mascara and concealer have been the two products I’ve found trickiest to replace so far so I’m still testing out the different options (any recomendations welcome!), but otherwise, I’ve found some amazing new products. Please let me know if you’d like to see a cruelty-free beauty favourites blog post as I’d be more than happy to share my collection.

I’d really love to hear your thoughts on this topic. Are you interested in transitioning to cruelty-free beauty, or perhaps you’ve already started? Equally I’d be intrigued to know if you purchase makeup that is tested on animals and that doesn’t bother you. Let’s talk in the comments below!

Love Chloe x

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1 Comment

  1. May 9, 2019 / 8:55 pm

    Welcome to the Cruelty Free Club 🙂
    Mascara wise; Barry M, has some good inexpensive options, Soap & Glory is also amazing, if you are happy to splash a bit of cash the MDM Flow mascara is ace!
    Concealer wise I love the LA Girl Concealer and a brand called ReCover who do a high coverage product.
    Kate x
    http://www.whatkatedidnext92.com

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